Entries by Ozuke

Kimchi Potsticker Recipe

Willow and I did a cooking demo at Alfalfa’s this Sunday.  The Kimchi dumplings that we made on site were a big hit, everything that went into them we grabbed off the shelves at the store.  I hope you enjoy this interactive dinner (kids love to try their hand at dumpling wrapping the results might […]

Miraculous Fruit

My most unforgettable fruit experience was one summer in Fujian Province, China.  I had not planned to go there.  Eighteen years old I was based in Shanghai learning Chinese for a year and my friend Beth had gone on a side trip and had gotten very sick.  She was stuck in bed on an IV […]

Moo Chi

Good Morning Kim Chi eaters. We are working on something new in our kitchen that we wanted to share with you. While we have been busy cranking out our traditional flavors we are also given to experimentation and exploration. This weeks project was root kim chi and it is delicious. It is made in the […]

God of Cookery

Hong Kong actor/director Stephen Chow made it into the mainstream US consciousness with 2001’s Shaolin Soccer and Kung Fu Hustle 2004.  Both films were solid examples of Chow’s already well established comedic styling.  Hong Kong movie makers are no slackers IMDb lists 68 separate movie appearances for Chow, he’s definitely a seasoned pro. There is […]

Why Cultured Foods?

Why Should You Eat Cultured Foods? Here are a few pointers: Fermenting foods is an age old way to preserve food. It was a way to use all the access produce from the summer and keep eating it all year round. This in itself is a great process to connect to seasonality and keep the […]

Directional Melons

No this post is not about a boob job gone awry. In Chinese there are three melons which have directional names. East melon a.k.a dong gua or winter melon is a simply enormous white fleshed thick green skinned melon that is often used in medicine and in soup making. West melon or xi gua is […]

The most intense of vegetables

Tom Robbin’s novel, Jitterbug Perfume, begins with these immortal words. ” The beet is the most intense of vegetables. The radish, admittedly is more feverish, but the fire of the radish is a cold fire, the of discontent not of passion. Tomatoes are lusty enough, yet there runs through tomatoes an undercurrent of frivolity. Beets […]