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Dishwire Press Release- Zuke in Whole Foods!

January 23rd, 2012 — 8:55am

Zuké Pickled Veggies Now Available at Whole Foods Locations in Boulder

 

 

Zuké Pickled Veggies Now Available at Whole Foods Locations in Boulder

January 23, 2012-Boulder, COLORADO—Esoteric Food Company announced today their presence in Whole Foods Market at Pearl Street, Ideal Market and Base-Mar Locations. Zuké (pronounced zoo-kay) short for zukemono, the Japanese word for pickled things-offers four varieties including Cabbage-Based Korean Kim Chi, Eastern European Dill and Caraway Sauerkraut, A Citrus & Ginger blend and the cleverly combined Beets, Hijiki Seaweed and Kale. All products are raw, organic and loaded with probiotics. They retail for $8.99 and are located in the refrigerated dairy sections at Ideal Market and Base-Mar and in the raw food case at Pearl Street.

Says Co-Founder, Willow King, ” We are excited that Whole Foods picked up our product…now these life giving tasty pickles are available to a larger audience.”

John Andersen, Buyer for Whole Foods Base-Mar, said, “May their beets go on your salad cause they rock.”

About Zuké:

Founded in 2011 by the Esoteric Food Company, Zuké is a line of organic, pickled veggies that taste amazing and happen to be extra good for you. Our flavors are familiar-some might say nostalgic-and we use an all-natural fermentation process to make our food probiotic…a fancy word for natural organisms that keeps you healthy. Whether it’s the fire of our kim chi or the subtle lemon notes in our citrus & ginger cabbage, our cultured foods will engage your senses and keep you on the up and up. Yep, all this from a little jar.

For more information: http://www.ozuke.com

Experiments at Ozuke

We are experimenting again in the esoteric kitchen. As many of you know, these live foods can have a mind of their own. Mara and I joke that we are pickle wranglers out on the wild fermentation frontier. They bubble and go flat, they get mushy and change color and occasionally they do just exactly the right thing and taste fresh, lively, sour, a little salty and full of flavor. Bingo.

We would like to add some more to our herd, so here are our experiments for this week:

Fennel, wild green apple and juniper berries

Curry sauerkraut with mustard seed and coriander

and a roasted hatch green chile version which we think might be just the thing.

Keep your eyes out on the open range and yeeehaah.

Moo Chi

Daikon, watermelon radish, parsnip and burdock

Good Morning Kim Chi eaters. We are working on something new in our kitchen that we wanted to share with you. While we have been busy cranking out our traditional flavors we are also given to experimentation and exploration. This weeks project was root kim chi and it is delicious. It is made in the same fashion as our napa cabbage version but using all sorts of sturdy, handsome root vegetables. Moo meaning radish in Korean and our kids think Moo Chi sounds like a mix between a cow, a martial art and the beloved Japanese treat, Mochi. While it is none of those things it sounds like all of them + something tasty to put on your nutritious bowl of brown rice, summer squash and snap peas. When I was reading about making moo kim chi I stumbled on the urban dictionary word: kimochi. It is a Japanese expression that means a gift given with no obligation. A gift from the heart. So here you go- our moo kim chi is a kimochi for you and your family… and when you ask for more: “May I have some moo chi,” it sounds like smoochie. So don’t be surprised if you get a kiss out of the deal as well. To your health!